Ruth 4:13 | Smooth Sailing and Shipwreck

Smooth Sailing and Shipwreck

Read:

“. . . she became his wife, . . .” Ruth 4:13

Reflect:

Problems come along with people. It’s unavoidable. The difference between smooth sailing and shipwreck in marriage lies in how couples navigate the rough waters. All unions have strengths and weaknesses. All joined in holy matrimony are either dynamic or deteriorating. The tension lies in the reality that the husband and wife must either progress or perish. 

Ruth’s marriage was a happy one, because their union had the blessing of God. Both Ruth and Boaz had prayed for the success of their covenant loyalty. There was a feeling of oneness between both. They both loved God, they were both journeying along the same road. 

They were partners for eternity. Whatever storms they were to face in the future, was of no concern – in little means or great comfort. Their hearts were bound together by a bond stronger than affection – the bond of grace. With grace, they were assured to endure whatever storms life brought them.

One cannot miss the impact Ruth would have on Boaz. The grace she exhibited made Boaz more than what he could have been on his own. Her qualities increased his physical and mental energy into greater productivity. She introduced a higher feeling of tender emotion which empowered him to love and lead.

They discovered together that the heart and the brain need to conspire with each other. Each needs the other. Without the combination of the two, they would be led into danger. To be all head and no heart makes one demanding and demeaning. To be all heart and no head makes one a reckless pushover.

Ruth had survived the storms of loss, poverty, loneliness, and now, as a wife to Boaz, she would be more than a housekeeper. She was to Boaz what a fire is to a hearth. Her very presence kept the frost out of Boaz’s thinking. She made everything in his life that was good even more beautiful. 

True love brings understanding, compassion, tenderness, comfort, kindness, closeness, companionship, and intimacy. The union with another is a mix of the mundane and joyous, the commonplace and romantic. It comes in waves, ripples, splashes, and tidal waves. It contains sunlight, wind, hail, and rain. It contains the hues of orange and yellow. Like the love of God, it thrives on closeness and survives the distance. 

Respond:

Let God love you fully today.