Ruth 4:6

There Must be Another Way

Read:

“. . . ‘I cannot redeem . . .’ “ Ruth 4:6

Reflect:

The law doesn’t take into account our intention and weaknesses. It simply demands perfection from us. We only begin to realize the intensity of the law when we discover it comes with a condition – perfection. 

God, however, never coerces us. Sometimes we wish He would force us to be obedient. At other times, we wish He would leave us alone. But with God, the pressure is off. The demands of the law are done away with. God only asks for a willing and obedient heart, He will move the galaxy to redeem us.

Boaz is contrasted by the close relative who is not named here in this chapter. He passes on the opportunity to act as a redeemer saying, “I cannot redeem it unless I ruin my own inheritance.” This nameless redeemer represents the law.

The law could not redeem us, it was impossible for it to do so. Involvement with the law will never make us right with God. What it does do is force us to face our own complicity in sin. The law was a law of death chiseled in stone tablets, it brought with it a ministry of condemnation. The law was never a savior, it was given as an attempt to control the old nature.

Like the other kinsman, the law was unable to save anyone. The other kinsman said it would mar his own inheritance. The law would have to lower its standards to save us. The law can’t redeem anyone. Never has and never will.

There are those who say they try hard to follow the Ten Commandments. There is no place in the system of the law that says we are to try hard, the law doesn’t permit us to go half way, and give it our best try, it demands perfection. There must be another way.

We need a Kinsman-Redeemer who will love us, one who was not only willing to risk everything but gave His life, when He took our place, paid an awful penalty and died on the cross.  In this sin-stained world we have a redeemer who does for us what the law could never do.  

Respond:

Stop trying and start trusting in the work of your Kinsman-Redeemer.